JFK Medical Center North Campus
561.842.6141
Located in the heart of West Palm Beach, our 250-bed acute care facility has more than 30 years of experience in providing the highest quality of care to our community.

What Are the Health Complications Associated with Diabetes?

Lifestyle adjustments and proper medical management of diabetes can help patients maintain their well-being through stable blood sugar levels. When blood sugar levels are poorly controlled, diabetic patients are at a heightened risk of developing a wide range of complications. Here at West Palm Hospital, our providers work closely with diabetic patients to help them comply with blood sugar monitoring, medication regimens, and lifestyle modifications. Our hospital is also a leading provider of wound management and other treatments for diabetic complications.

Diabetic Ulcers

Proper wound care is of particular concern to diabetics because the disease contributes to the slow healing of wounds. This is because poor blood circulation is associated with diabetes. When wounds are sustained, proper blood flow is necessary for the healing process. Another way this disease can lead to diabetic ulcers is through peripheral neuropathy, or nerve damage. When uncontrolled blood glucose damages the nerves, patients may experience numbness in the affected area – often the foot. This may mean that a patient can injure his or her foot without realizing it. The lack of proper care for an undetected wound can prevent it from healing properly. In very severe cases, diabetic ulcers may eventually lead to amputations.

Gastroparesis

Gastroparesis is another way in which diabetic neuropathy can lead to additional health problems. Gastroparesis, or delayed gastric emptying, occurs when the muscles that control the stomach and intestines no longer work properly. This is caused by damage of the vagus nerve. Impaired function of these muscles can slow or even stop the movement of food through the gastrointestinal tract. It’s important to treat gastroparesis or other complications may develop such as gastrointestinal blockages and bacterial overgrowth.

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

The cells of the body rely on insulin to escort blood sugar into the cells where it can be used for fuel. When there isn’t enough insulin or the body cannot use insulin properly, the cells may begin to breakdown fat for fuel instead. This leads to the buildup of ketones—a byproduct—in the blood. High levels of ketones are dangerous. This life-threatening condition requires emergency medical care.

For diabetic wound care near West Palm Beach, FL, you can turn to JFK Medical Center North. We offer specialized wound management, along with other hospital services such as pain care and orthopedics. Calling (888) 256-7694 will connect you with our Consult-A-Nurse line—a complimentary service of HCA hospitals.


What Is a Compression Fracture and How Is It Treated?

A compression fracture is a broken vertebra, which is a bone in the spine. It usually occurs when the front of the vertebra is compressed. When the front of the vertebra collapses, but the back does not, it creates a wedge-shaped fracture. Other types of compression fractures are crush fractures, in which the entire bone collapses, and burst fractures, in which both the front and back of the vertebra display loss of height. Compression fractures are associated with osteoporosis and they typically affect older patients. A specialist in orthopedics at West Palm Hospital can help patients understand their treatment options.

Medications

Compression fractures do not always require invasive medical treatments, particularly if they are stable fractures. For pain care, patients may be prescribed medications. Assuming that the compression fracture was indeed related to osteoporosis, patients may also be prescribed medications to treat weakened bones and prevent additional bone loss. These can include bisphosphonates, calcitonin, parathyroid hormone, and estrogen agonist/antagonist medications.

Bracing

A specialist in orthopedics may sometimes recommend the use of specialized back braces, including hyperextension braces, corset braces, or molded jackets. Patients may wear back braces to manage pain, promote healing, and reduce the risk of deformity.

Activity

Some patients may be asked to undergo a brief period of best rest. A decline in physical activity may be followed by sessions with a physical therapist. Physical therapy can help patients strengthen the back muscles and improve range of motion.

Surgery

When conservative treatments aren’t enough to manage pain, patients might consider surgical options. These include vertebroplasty, which involves injecting liquid cement into the fractured bone. However, the most favorable outcomes for this procedure may occur in patients with recent fractures not caused by osteoporosis. Balloon kyphoplasty is another surgical option. It involves creating a cavity with a special balloon to hold the liquid cement. Spinal fusion is a third option. It fuses together two or more vertebrae to prevent movement between them.

The Orthopedic & Spine Institute of JFK Medical Center North offers a continuum of care for patients with fractures and other orthopedic conditions. Our specialists in orthopedics near West Palm Beach, FL, conduct comprehensive evaluations to personalize orthopedic care recommendations for each patient. You can request a referral to a specialist in orthopedics by calling our Consult-A-Nurse line at (888) 256-7694.


What to Expect in Postoperative Physical Therapy

After undergoing orthopedic surgery, physical therapy will be an integral component of your recovery, since a physical therapist will work closely with you to restore your mobility and independence while focusing on your unique physical needs. You will likely work with a physical therapist both before and after your surgery so that the procedure goes smoothly, but the most intense work will take place primarily after your operation. Below, you can get a closer look at what you might expect in these postoperative therapy sessions, which will take place on an outpatient basis.

Immediate return to limited activity

Even after major procedures, such as spine surgery or hip replacement, your physical therapist will typically work with you in the hospital to help you get an immediate return to activity. You may not be able to perform many activities, but getting up and moving—most often with the assistance of ambulatory aids—will ensure a more rapid recovery.

Gait training and functional exercise

Being able to walk around is important for maintaining your independence after orthopedic surgery, so a big focus for your therapy will be gait training. You might start out with a cane or walker, practicing on level ground, and then progress to stairs and uneven surfaces without the help of ambulatory aids.

Isometric muscle strengthening exercises

Not only is postoperative therapy designed to restore your mobility and rebuild your strength; it is also intended to improve your muscle tone and strength through isometric exercises and range-of-motion exercises. These activities help to improve your overall physical capabilities and prevent future injuries that may require further surgical care.

For complete orthopedic care and outpatient therapy in West Palm Beach, connect with JFK Medical Center North at (888) 256-7694. Our nurses are available to answer your call 24/7 for physician referrals and hospital information that will get you on the right track to healing.


Why You Should Exercise When You Have Arthritis

When you’re struggling to cope with the pain of arthritis, exercising may not be a priority. But actually, specialists in orthopedics generally encourage arthritis patients to remain physically active. Doing so can help manage arthritis symptoms and support overall well-being. The physical therapists at West Palm Hospital can help patients with arthritis learn how to exercise safely to promote joint health.

Risks of Inactivity

A physically inactive lifestyle contributes to certain health risks, regardless of whether a person has arthritis or not. These include diabetes, overweight and obesity, cardiovascular disease, and even osteoporosis. Additionally, specialists in orthopedics caution that inactivity among patients with arthritis can make their symptoms worse.

Benefits of Regular Exercise

The benefits of exercising regularly despite arthritis symptoms are clear. Patients who remain active tend to have reduced pain and better pain tolerance. Physical activity promotes good balance and joint flexibility. It also strengthens the muscles that support the joints. All of these benefits can make it easier for patients with arthritis to move around and complete daily tasks.

Types of Exercises

Individuals who have medical conditions such as arthritis may wish to consider speaking with a doctor before starting or changing an exercise plan. The guidance of a doctor of orthopedics and a physical therapist can help patients exercise safely despite their condition. Physical therapists may recommend a balance of therapeutic or rehabilitative exercises and recreational exercises. There is a wide range of recreational activities that an arthritis patient might enjoy, such as walking, jogging, and swimming or water aerobics. Therapeutic exercises are those that a physical therapist develops for a patient. These target specific areas of the body that can benefit from strengthening and conditioning. Physical therapists can provide recommendations on how often patients should perform these rehabilitative exercises at home.

Outpatient therapy services, including physical therapy, are just some of the specialized healthcare services you’ll find at West Palm Hospital. For more than 30 years, our medical center has been a leading provider of orthopedics, pain care, and other hospital services near West Palm Beach, FL. For general information about physical therapy or orthopedic care, call (888) 256-7694 and speak with a registered nurse.


What to Expect in Postoperative Physical Therapy

physical therapy | West Palm BeachAfter undergoing orthopedic surgery, physical therapy will be an integral component of your recovery, since a physical therapist will work closely with you to restore your mobility and independence while focusing on your unique physical needs. You will likely work with a physical therapist both before and after your surgery so that the procedure goes smoothly, but the most intense work will take place primarily after your operation. Below, you can get a closer look at what you might expect in these postoperative therapy sessions, which will take place on an outpatient basis.

Immediate return to limited activity
Even after major procedures, such as spine surgery or hip replacement, your physical therapist will typically work with you in the hospital to help you get an immediate return to activity. You may not be able to perform many activities, but getting up and moving—most often with the assistance of ambulatory aids—will ensure a more rapid recovery.

Gait training and functional exercise
Being able to walk around is important for maintaining your independence after orthopedic surgery, so a big focus for your therapy will be gait training. You might start out with a cane or walker, practicing on level ground, and then progress to stairs and uneven surfaces without the help of ambulatory aids.

Isometric muscle strengthening exercises
Not only is postoperative therapy designed to restore your mobility and rebuild your strength; it is also intended to improve your muscle tone and strength through isometric exercises and range-of-motion exercises. These activities help to improve your overall physical capabilities and prevent future injuries that may require further surgical care.

For complete orthopedic care and outpatient therapy in West Palm Beach, connect with West Palm Hospital at (888) 256-7694. Our nurses are available to answer your call 24/7 for physician referrals and hospital information that will get you on the right track to healing.


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